THE AZTEC CHILDREN MAXIMO & BARTOLA

 

 STATE GAZETTE - TRENTON - NEW JERSEY - SEPTEMBER 2, 1850

 


 

STATE GAZETTE

 

Tom Thumb Under-done

 

The New York Medical Gazette gives this account of two dwarfs, which the editor con-siders greater curiosities than Tom Thumb:

 

Two Indian dwarfs, a brother and sister, have been brought to this city from St. Salvador, said to belong to one of the tribes of Indians in Central America.-

 

They are a greater curiosity than has ever been exhibit-ed in the line of dwarfs, not excepting Tom Thumb, of Barnum notoriety.  The stature of the female is less than his, while the male is somewhat taller.  Both are slender, with long limbs, and bodies well formed in all respects, with the exception of the head, which is extra-ordinarily flat, the superciliary ridge, and indi-cating the almost entire absence of the cereb-rum, while the cerebellum is normal in size pro-portioned to the size of the head, which is small

and resembling that of certain species of the ape.  The eyes are jet black, and are beaming with intelligence, while the hair which is also black, is long, straight and silken.  The skin is swarthy, and they would appear to be a mixture of English and Spanish blood.  The boy is said to be 15, and the girl 13, and both are playful and happy, unless when crossed in their will, when they cry like infants, which is all the noise they made while we were present, although they understood when spoken to in Spanish, and we were told that they can pronounce some words indistinctly. 

 

The children are both very sociable and affec-tionate, grateful for kindness, and climb into the laps of visitors with the utmost familiarity; while their continuances are certainly expressive of unusual vivacity and intellect.  No semblance of idiocy is present, as the conformation of the head might lead us to suppose, nor is either of them deaf: all their senses, indeed, seem perfect. 

 

They dance and play together, and are very carefully attended to by a man and his wife, to whom they are entrusted by the gentleman who bro't them hither.  The father and mother are represented to have been of ordinary size.

 

They mutually regarded their children with dislike, and mingle with the hogs and other inferior animals, so that they very gladly rid themselves of any further trouble with their unfortunate offspring, by selling them.

Speculation will be rife among naturalists as to the causes of these anomalies, for such they are.  Whether their heads were compressed in infancy to so great an extent as to interfere with their growth and development may be sur-mised, and yet "Flat Head Indians," who are the victims of this cruelty, are not known to be thereby bereft of their fair proportions.

 

N. Y. Medical Gazette

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 


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